Funding For Intergenerational Programming

While the concept of intergenerational programming has been offered for years, what would happen if we went beyond mostly planned moments, where the children arrive at a retirement residence and the seniors are “entertained” by watching the children engage in an activity? What if we embed opportunities for children and seniors to connect naturally through caring, responsive interactions that are part of a daily routine? 

Thanks to funding from a private trust, over the next 4-years Andrew Fleck Children’s Services will be collaborating and learning with the Council on Aging of Ottawa, Families Canada and others to develop a demonstration site of best practices for intergenerational programming as a part of licensed early learning and care in 3 unique settings: on-campus beside an age-in-place residence, neighbourhood based in collaboration with a church congregation and co-located as part of a senior’s village including long-term care. This funding allows us to focus on providing quality intergenerational programming that recognizes the rights, and dignity of children and senior participants and share our lessons learned broadly.